School of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses

For full course listings, please visit the summer and semester course pages.

ARC 307: Searching and Finding: Archaeological Techniques and Methods 
- Provence has a rich heritage dating back to its prehistoric settlements. This course will explore the archaeological treasures of the region with a look at theoretical foundations of archaeological research as well as at the practical art of field research. Includes two weeks on an excavation site. ARC310 is mandatory for this class. Limited enrollment.

ARC 309: Ancient European Art and Archaeology Development of European Mediterranean societies and civilizations from the arrival of the first humans up to the Roman conquest of the continent. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

ARC 310: Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations - Overview of the Mediterranean basin from the first civilizations in Egypt and Middle-East up to the Roman expansion over Europe. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

ART 105: Drawing & Painting (Studio Art) - Intended for students with little or no experience in painting and drawing. Includes work from the figure, museum study, still-life and landscape work in the Aix countryside. Additional fee required. 6 contact hours per week.

ART 106: Drawing & Painting (Studio Art) - Intended for students with little or no experience in painting and drawing. Includes work from the figure, museum study, still-life and landscape work in the Aix countryside. Additional fee required. 6 contact hours per week.

ART 110: Photography - Intended for students with little or no experience in photography, this course is designed to introduce photography as a means of personal expression and quality composition of an image. Areas of concentration include: creativity, composition, basic computer/digital imaging/editing and critiquing the work of others. Assumes no previous knowledge of photography. Assignments are to be completed with a digital camera. Additional fee required.

ART 160/360: Photography: Philosophy and Practice of Vision - A specific analysis of the photographic image in reference to the world history of photography to develop students aesthetic judgments concerning their own production. Digital production around various themes required.

ART 231: Survey History of Western Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages - Initiation to the language and techniques of art history, and study of painting, sculpture, and architecture of Western art from prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages. Typically includes an excursion to sites in the region.

ART 232: Survey History of Western Art: Renaissance to Present - Study of painting, sculpture and architecture from the Renaissance to the present. Typically includes an excursion to Paris.

ART 270: Creative Writing and the Intercultural Experience - Beginners - The study and practice of creative nonfiction writing in relation to the study abroad experience. Techniques of writing creative nonfiction and development of the creative process, including writing exercises, editing, and workshop. The course will examine the ways in which the writing process and cross-cultural experiences are parallel endeavors that can serve to inform and answer each other.

ART 305: Intermediate/Advanced Drawing & Painting - Intended for students with intermediate to advanced skills in painting and drawing. Includes work from the figure, museum study, still-life and landscape work in the Aix countryside. Additional fee required. 6 contact hours per week.

ART 306: Intermediate/Advanced Drawing & Painting - Intended for students with intermediate to advanced skills in painting and drawing. Includes work from the figure, museum study, still-life and landscape work in the Aix countryside. Additional fee required. 6 contact hours per week.

ART 320: Picasso, Matisse, and the Mediterranean - Understanding early 20th century art through an investigation of its sources in Mediterranean myth and reality.

ART 340: Medieval Art and Architecture - A search for the medieval mind as it is expressed in Christian art and architecture from its earliest beginnings in the Catacombs of Rome, through the rich mosaics and domes of byzantine culture to the raising of the great Gothic Cathedrals in northern Europe. Typically includes excursions to regional sites.

ART 341: Islamic Art and Architecture - This course surveys the arts and architecture of the Islamic World from the rise of the Umayyads in the 7th century CE until modern times. It will examine the social, historical and cultural contexts within which Islamic art and architecture developed. The aim of this course is to provide a basic understanding and a broad awareness of the major themes of Islamic art and architecture, of their main achievements and of their regional diversity.

ART 351: The Sacred and Taboo in Art: A Conceptual and Poetical Studio Practice - Using a variety of media - drawing, painting, digital imagery, 3D and installation students will explore the notions of the sacred and the taboo in art. The studio course will include an historical and theoretical study of these notions throughout the history of art with a prime focus on the 20th and 21st century. 90 contact hours.

ART 370: Creative Writing and the Intercultural Experience – Intermediate/Advanced - The study and practice of creative nonfiction writing in relation to the study abroad experience. Techniques of writing creative nonfiction and development of the creative process, including writing exercises, editing, and workshop. The course will examine the ways in which the writing process and cross-cultural experiences are parallel endeavors that can serve to inform and answer each other.

ART 381: The XIXth Century and French Impressionism - Historical and critical analysis of painting in the 19th century with emphasis on the history of Impressionism. Typically includes an excursion to sites in Paris.

ART 382: Cezanne and Van Gogh - In-depth study of the lives and works of Paul Cézanne and Vincent van Gogh. Typically includes site visits.

ART/FRE/LIT 411: Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context – French Honors Seminar - Course proposes an exploration of literary and artistic themes related to the notion of space, both personal (internal) and geographic (external), and specifically the tensions created by the crossing (“Traversée”) between one space and another.

BUS 301: International Business - Basic principles of international business and management with emphasis on foreign exchange, risk analysis, comparative management techniques, interaction between host societies and multinational corporations, and changing government policies affecting business.

BUS 302: Creating Innovative Brand - The focus of the project-based class is to explore how to build innovative brands, where brand is defined as “a sensibility” or a “reputation” - departing from traditional perspectives of brand.

BUS 303: International Intercultural Management - Investigation of globalization through the study of marketing goods and services in a multicultural environment and the management of an intercultural workforce.

BUS 304: Business Ethics in the Global Market - This course investigates ethical problems in business practice. Topics include personal morality in profit-oriented enterprises; codes of ethics, obligations to employees and other stakeholders; truth in advertising, whistle-blowing, and company loyalty; self and government regulation; the logic and future of capitalism; and the changing responsibilities of the manager in a rapidly globalizing business environment.

BUS 305: Global Marketing - Exploration of basic knowledge of global marketing focusing on the impact of environment on the strategies used by firms, and the understanding of consumer behavior management as it relates to the development and implementation of global marketing strategies.

BUS/FRE 311: Business French - Intensive training in French for business and commercial purposes, emphasizing specialized forms and vocabulary.

COM/JOU/FRE 307: Topics in Contemporary Media I - Follows major French and international news stories as reported in French newspapers and on radio and television.

COM/JOU/FRE 308: Topics in Contemporary Media II - Follows major French and international news stories as reported in French newspapers and on radio and television.

COM 312: Speaking of Provence, From Myth to Media - Introduction to representations of Provence, from the troubadours to Ridley Scott, in history, literature, media, and song. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

COM/HIS 314: France during the Occupation: 1939-1945 - The study of representations of France during World War II in history, literature and media, in both the Occupied and Unoccupied Zones, the German presence, the government in Vichy and the Resistance. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

COM/IR 316: Media and Conflict - This course examines the role media play in the progression and public perceptions of conflict. Relevant topics will include media and military intervention, portrayals of protest movements, and news and entertainment coverage of crime, rumors, domestic politics, violence, and ethnicity.

ECO 301: International Economics and the European Union - Introduction to European economic development followed by a study of economic factors in European trade up to and since the establishment of the Common Market.

ECO 304: Economic Globalization: Growth and Development - Introduction to the economic analysis of development and growth policies intended to familiarize students with the practices and theories of economic development.

EDU 301: Comparative Education - Study of the social, historical and cultural factors that have influenced the development of educational institutions in Europe, Asia and the USA. Required participation in teaching at French elementary schools.

ES 200: Ecology of France and the Mediterranean Environment - Survey of current theories and practices in ecology. Course examines the varying processes of the Earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere drawing from the example of the Mediterranean basin. Topics include geological processes and hazards, water resources, waste management, energy and mineral resources, and human impact on global climate change in this sensitive region. Three class hours and laboratory field study throughout the area. Prerequisite: laboratory work in any other hard science.

ES/POL 308: Geopolitics in the Mediterranean Basin - Examines the contemporary geopolitical environment of the Mediterranean Basin in order to better understand the security issues confronting the region. Typically includes an excursion to sites in Paris.

ES/POL 309: Global Environmental Politics - Exploration of the main environmental problems facing the international community today with an analysis of the roles of states, international organizations, multinational corporations and civil societies in the causation and solution process

FIN 301: International Finance - This course deals with the international aspects of corporate finance. Topics include foreign exchange with emphasis on exchange rate determination, exchange rate risk management, international money and capital markets, international capital budgeting, cost of capital, and international trade financing.

FLM/FRE 355: France as seen through its Movies, post WWII to the 1970’s Study of the different facets of France — from literary imagination to social issues, , from the postwar period to the 70s  — through a varied selection of films.

FLM/FRE 356: France as seen through its Movies, The 1980’s to Today Study of the different facets of France — from literary imagination to social issues, from the 1980’s to today — through a varied selection of films.

FRE 101-102: Practical Elementary French I then II - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those with little or no previous study. Intensive four hours classroom learning tied to two hours workshops and activities. Development of an understanding of oral French through listening and speaking practices.

FRE 102-201: Practical Elementary French II then Intermediate French I - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those who have completed the equivalent of one semester of college level French. Intensive four hours classroom learning tied to two hours practical workshops and activities. Development of an understanding of oral French through dialogue and role-playing.

FRE 201-202: Intermediate French I then II - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those who have completed the equivalent of two semesters of college level French. Intensive four hours classroom learning tied to two hours practical workshops and activities. Development of oral French through conversation.

FRE 202: Intermediate French II - Intended for those who have completed the equivalent of three semesters of college level French. Intensive four hours classroom learning. Development of oral French through conversation.

FRE 211: Living in France: Intercultural Communication - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two to three semesters of college level French. Intensive focus on oral practice looking at popular French culture.

FRE 213: Current Events with the French Media - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two to three semesters of college level French. Intensive focus on oral comprehension and expression looking at TV news, radio, magazines and newspapers.

FRE 301: Advanced French I: Structure and Expression - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of four semesters or two years of college level French. Advanced written and oral practice and grammar review. Essay topics follow a simulation enriched with a variety of documentation and multimedia activities.

FRE 302: Advanced French II: Conversation and Composition - Intended for student who have completed the equivalent of five semesters of college level. Students improve their advanced command of oral and written French.

FRE 306: Cross-Cultural Studies in Food and Culture - Both the Mediterranean diet and French Gastronomy have been declared by UNESCO as world heritage. This course will explore the language and the culinary customs of French cuisine, examining differences in food patterns between the US and France, the fundamentals of French and regional food and eating, including the history and use of ingredients, as well as political and economic factors affecting rural French food systems.

FRE/LIT 315: Readings in French Literature I - Readings in French literature, from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE/LIT 316: Readings in French Literature II - Readings in French literature, focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE/HIS 328: Provencal History and Culture through its Monuments - Introduction to the History of Provence and a study of its most exemplary monuments. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

FRE 331: Contemporary France: Society, Politics and Culture - Study of contemporary French civilization through political, cultural and social issues.

FRE: 335: The Phonetics of Contemporary French - Phonetic theory illustrated by aural practice and pronunciation. Intensive practice in sound reproduction and fine-tuning the ear to new sound combinations.

FRE/THE 357: Communication in French Theatre - Intensive training in oral communication through reading, recitation, and discussions of modern theatrical texts.

FRE/POL 376: Contemporary French Identities - Examining some of the main points of division as well as of unity in France today, this course explores the republican ideal, its background, the crisis it is currently undergoing and contemporary French identity(s).

FRE 401: Translation and Stylistics I: from Colloquial to Literature - Translation from English to French and French to English of literary texts, with constant reference to technical and theoretical considerations.

FRE 402: Translation and Structure II: from Colloquial to Literature - This course is designed to provide advanced instruction and supervised practice in translation from English into French and from French into English. During the course, students will be working with texts of moderate to high difficulty. Several text typologies will be entertained: different extracts from novels, short stories, poems, newspaper articles in both languages. Another part of the course will focus on the daily use of the French language.

FRE/LING 412: Contemporary French: the Linguistics of Everyday Language - Course will reflect on and undertake a series of analyses on the language forms in current practice in French society. Analytical linguistics tools will be applied to usage in current-day, intercultural, youth, political, advertising, etc.

FRE/LIT 414: France and Francophone Literature, a Dialogue - Covering subjects such as the spirit of the desert, slavery, the Mediterranean and the initiation journey, this course reflects on the ongoing dialogue between authors from France and authors from French-speaking countries of former colonial territories.

HIS 301: European History: 1870–1918 - Major social, economic, political, and diplomatic developments in European history from 1870 to 1918.

HIS 303: France and Europe in the Cold War - Study of the evolution of the European societies from the post-war period to the fall of the Berlin Wall through arts, literature, architecture, alternative cultures and social evolution linked to the exceptional economic growth of the postwar period ending with the oil shocks (1970’s).

HIS/SOC 304: Muslim Presence in Europe - Overview of the long-term interaction between the Muslim world and the West, not as two separate entities, but with emphasis on their historic commonality, and their dialectic relation. Course focuses on the debates regarding the Muslim population in Europe, covering concepts of religion and secularism, the history of Muslim populations in Europe, legal issues, human rights, feminism, and modernity. Field study will take us to specific sites in Marseille, historically linked with the Muslim community.

IR/POL 303: International Relations - Introduction to international relations with emphasis on how international relations have changed as a result of globalization. Typically includes an excursion to Geneva.

LIT 325: The European Novel - Course will explore the portrayal of shifting perspectives not only in terms of narrative style, but more assertively in terms of how life as a European shifted. We will examine changing social and political orders as well as how characters place themselves in history.

PHI 312: Political Ethics - Study of how the ethical stances of philosophers from different time periods, ancient and modern, relate to the broader questions of Man’s place in society and the universe.

POL 307: The European Union: Integration, Enlargement, Unity - Analysis of the historical evolution, the institutions and the policies of the European Union within the context of European diplomatic history.

PSY 304: Human Development in Cultural Contexts - Study of human development from a psychodynamic perspective. Draws extensively on the theories of such psychoanalytic thinkers as Freud, Melanie Klein, Wilfred Bion and Donald Winnicott.

REL 311: Early Christianity in Europe - Drawing on the example of Provence's evolution from the Pagan era to the first evangelization of the region, this class will explore the theology and religious practices of the first five centuries of Europe's Christianity.