Study Abroad - Aix Summer Courses

Summer 2017 Course Schedule

Below is a complete listing of all summer courses taught in Aix and are 3 units each (45 contact hours) unless otherwise specified. The Summer 2016 Course Schedule is above and students are encouraged to review it for the most up-to-date offerings. If a course is needed for major, minor, or core credit, students are encouraged to contact enroll@iaufrance.org. Courses may also be offered as seminars for students to fulfill specific requirements. 

Courses with an FRE title are conducted in French, some of which are cross-listed with non-French disciplines.  300 level French courses or higher require that students have completed FRE 202 or the equivalent prior to enrollment.

 

ART 207A: Painting and Drawing II Intermediate
SESSION A
The overarching purpose of the painting and drawing courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work and museum study. 90 contact hours. ART 311 is a co-requisite.

ART 107A: Painting and Drawing I  Foundation

SESSION A
The overarching purpose of the painting and drawing courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work and museum study. 90 contact hours. ART 311 is a co-requisite. 

ART 165C: Photography
SESSION C
This course is designed to introduce photography as a fine art and a means of personal expression.  The emphasis in this course is on the elements of composition and editing for a final quality black and white image.  Areas of concentration include: creativity, composition, use of basic camera functions, use of computer/digital imaging/editing and analyzing/critiquing the work of others. Students are expected to bring a digital camera and a laptop. 

ART 275B: Creative Nonfiction in Provence - Beginning or Intermediate Level
SESSION B
The study and practice of creative nonfiction writing in relation to the study abroad experience.  Techniques of writing creative nonfiction and development of the creative process are covered, including writing exercises, workshop and final essays. 

ART 307A: Painting and Drawing III Advanced
SESSION A
The overarching purpose of the painting and drawing courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work and museum study. 90 contact hours. ART 311 is a co-requisite. 

ART 311A: Art Criticism and Aesthetics
SESSION A
Intensive critical and comparative analysis of works from different periods and cultures, with an emphasis on the relationship between content and form. Includes three full-day seminar/site visits. The site visits take place on one Thursday and two Saturdays – TBA. 45 contact hours. 

NEW! ART 348A: The Neuroscience of Art Perception
SESSION A
This new course integrates our mechanistic understanding of the visual system with the artistic devices employed throughout history focusing on examples gleaned from French Art including cave paintings from Lascaux, medieval stained glass, and the work of Ingres, Seurat, Monet, Rouault, Picasso and Matisse.  A novel aspect of this course will be a studio component that makes art utilizing neural principles discussed in the course.  This is an extreme cross-disciplinary course. It is hoped that students who are art majors would develop a working knowledge of how to enhance their art by tapping into how the visual system works while science majors would gain some studio art skills and an appreciation of art using scientific principles to which they are accustomed. 

ART 365C: Advanced Photography
SESSION C
This course is designed to introduce photography as a fine art and a means of personal expression.  The emphasis in this course is on the elements of composition and editing for a final quality black and white image.  Areas of concentration include: creativity, composition, use of basic camera functions, use of computer/digital imaging/editing and analyzing/critiquing the work of others. Students are expected to bring a digital camera and a laptop. 

ART 375B: Creative Nonfiction in Provence - Advanced Level
SESSION B
The study and practice of creative nonfiction writing in relation to the study abroad experience.  Techniques of writing creative nonfiction and development of the creative process are covered, including writing exercises, workshop and final essays. 

ART 385C: Sculpture
SESSION C
In collaboration with Greg Wyatt, Sculptor in Residence, The Cathedral of St. John's the Divine, NY,NY. A studio course conceived to familiarize students with the full range of materials and procedures needed in the process of bronze lost–wax casting as it relates to site-specific monumental scale bronze sculptures. Students will work with plaster, plastilina, clay and wax resulting in a final small model bronze casting at the Fonderie de Coubertin, renowned for its casts of among others,  Auguste Rodin’s “Gates of Hell” . All-day excursions and workshops. For more information on Greg Wyatt - http://www.g-wyatt.com/index.html 

ART/ARH 322A: Modern Art, Provence and the Mediterranean
SESSION A
Modern Art was born in France and many of the most famous figures (Cézanne, Picasso, Matisse, van Gogh) spent time in Provence or turned their attention to the Mediterranean landscapes but also to myth and culture (Delacroix, Ingres). Emphasis will be given to context, and the historical and artistic ties between France, Provence and the Mediterranean from the 19th to the mid-20th century. 

BUS/WS 306A: The Global Wine Industry: A French Immersion
SESSION A
This intensive six week, three credit course is designed for students who wish to learn about the global wine industry and for those who are considering a career in wine. The course covers the fundamentals of viticulture and enology, famous French regions including wine styles, grapes, climate and culture. The course incorporates the business of wine including marketing, branding, consumer behavior and more. Typically includes visits to wine producers in the region. 

NEW! COM/IR 316A: Media and Conflict
SESSION A
This course examines the role of media in the progression and public perceptions of conflict. Relevant topics will include media and military intervention, portrayals of protest movements, and news and entertainment coverage of crime, rumors, domestic politics, violence, and ethnicity.

FRE 101B: Beginning French I
SESSION B
Intensive practical introduction to French for those with little or no previous study.

FRE 101C: Beginning French I
SESSION C
Intensive practical introduction to French for those with little or no previous study.

FRE 201B: Intermediate French I
SESSION B
Continued development of competence in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding spoken French.  Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of one year of college-level French.

FRE 201C: Intermediate French I
SESSION C
Continued development of competence in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding spoken French.  Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of one year of college-level French. 

FRE 202B: Intermediate French II
SESSION B
Continued development of competence in more advanced elements of reading, writing, speaking and understanding spoken French.  Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of three semesters of college-level French. 

FRE 202C: Intermediate French II
SESSION C
Continued development of competence in more advanced elements of reading, writing, speaking and understanding spoken French.  Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of three semesters of college-level French. 

FRE 301B: Advanced French I
SESSION B
Review, usage and perfection of French.  Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two years of college-level French. 

FRE 301C: Advanced French I
SESSION C
Review, usage and perfection of French.  Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two years of college-level French. 

FRE 411A: Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context – French Honors Seminar (4 credits)
SESSION A
Course proposes an exploration of literary and artistic themes related to the notion of space, both personal (internal) and geographic (external), and specifically the tensions created by the crossing (“Traversée”) between one space and another. 

NEW! FRE/LIT 383A: Writing in Provence: Literature and Regional Culture
SESSION A
How writers whose subjects celebrate Provence and the interactions between its inhabitants and its visitors help students better comprehend their own immersion in the region and in the language. This course will guide students to analyze and write their own personal reflections inspired by regional writers such as Marcel Pagnol, Jean Giono, René Char, Maylis de Kérangal, Stendhal and others. 

HIS/COM 314A: France During the Occupation: 1939-1945
SESSION A
This course studies the representations of France during World War II in history, literature and media, in both the Occupied and Unoccupied Zones, the German presence, the government in Vichy and the Resistance. Includes field studies to regional sites. 

POL 317A: Democracy and Environmental Policy
SESSION A
How do our politics and our democracy effect the environment?  Answers to this question will be sought through the examination of the environmental, public health, and  agriculture policies of the U.S. and France. This course will integrate overnight field studies to national parks and environmental reserves.

 

NEW! PSY 225C: Developing Effective Communication and Life Skills
SESSION C
This course is an interpersonal communication course that uses engagement and reflection to enhance your ability to communicate effectively with others. Through activities designed to enhance self-awareness and self-management, you will explore who and how you want to be both personally and professionally. This highly interactive course utilizes a workshop format where students practice communication in an experiential learning model. 

PSY 230C: Human Sexuality
SESSION C
This course will discuss past and present analysis on research and historical underpinnings influencing the cultural evolution of sexuality across cultures. Sexual behaviors and identity will be discussed through personal development, culture, and biological influences as well as the influence of attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, practices and myths on human sexuality. Course content will also examine sexuality throughout different developmental stages. This course may include potential visits to local clinics and possible interviews with mental health care professionals in Aix. 

NEW! PSY 333B: Abnormal Psychology
SESSION B
This course examines the historical conception of abnormal psychology and what is culturally considered abnormal behavior. A connection is drawn from the historical foundations of abnormal psychology to present-day assessment, diagnosis, theory, research, causes and treatment. By using a bio-psycho-social framework, students will explore the development and utilization of appropriate preventative and intervention measures. This course may include potential visits to local clinics and possible interviews with mental health care professionals in Aix. 

NEW! PSY 350B: Diversity in Contemporary Families
SESSION B
The importance of diversity has gained significant ground within the United States in recent years. Stereotypical conceptions of diversity are limited to binaries, such as African American-White, Straight (Heterosexual)-Gay, ‘Rich’-‘Poor’, and other binaries that limit our understanding of the truly rich, broad and intersecting identities that all human beings have. Like diversity, ‘family’ systems are evolving with a multitude of definitions including, but not limited to single parent households, single/dual-earning households, same-sex households and many others. Our understanding of the family has developed throughout history with the influence of social, political and economic institutions. This course will survey the evolution of ‘family’ within United States culture through deep reading, critical discussion and analysis of entertainment media.